2020.09.24 MedPage Today

Nursing was the most common occupation and residential care facilities were the most common reported job setting for healthcare professionals (HCPs) with COVID-19, CDC researchers found.

In a subset of six jurisdictions reporting occupational type or job setting for HCPs with COVID-19, 30% of infected HCPs were nurses — twice the proportion of nurses in the healthcare workforce (15%) — and two-thirds of cases were in nursing and residential care settings, reported Michelle Hughes, PhD, of the CDC, and colleagues in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Similar to previously reported U.S. data, HCPs with COVID-19 who were male, age 65 or older, or non-white, or had underlying medical conditions, were particularly likely to have died.

The researchers cited workers in long-term care facilities as those most in need of attention during the pandemic.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple challenges in long-term care settings have been identified, including inadequate staffing and PPE, and insufficient training in infection prevention and control,” Hughes and colleagues wrote. “As the pandemic continues, it is essential to meet the health and safety needs of HCPs serving populations requiring long-term care.”

Even HCPs who do not provide direct patient care, such as administrative staff members and environmental service workers, were at risk, Hughes and colleagues also emphasized. About 19% of cases among HCPs had such jobs.

Similar to previously reported U.S. data, HCPs with COVID-19 who were male, age 65 or older, or nonwhite, or had underlying medical conditions, were particularly likely to have died.

 

The researchers cited workers in long-term care facilities as those most in need of attention during the pandemic.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple challenges in long-term care settings have been identified, including inadequate staffing and PPE, and insufficient training in infection prevention and control,” Hughes and colleagues wrote. “As the pandemic continues, it is essential to meet the health and safety needs of HCPs serving populations requiring long-term care.”

Even HCPs who do not provide direct patient care, such as administrative staff members and environmental service workers, were at risk, Hughes and colleagues also emphasized. About 19% of cases among HCPs had such jobs.

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